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Education & Training

CMIB Training Grant


Interdisciplinary Program in Microbe-Host Biology

Today's reality includes emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant organisms and new infectious agents, a growing concern for worldwide pandemics, the use of infectious agents in offensive bio-warfare, and an enlarging list of opportunistic infections. These challenges to human health necessitate comprehensive interdisciplinary training programs for the next generation of scientists in studies of the microbe-host interface.

This program is a unique multidisciplinary training experience focused on the microbe-host interface and will prepare students for a career in the breadth of the biomedical workforce. The training program enriches existing training programs in several ways by emphasizing 1) a highly interactive scientific community, 2) a multidisciplinary approach to science, 3) exposure of trainees to the biomedical research community of a large academic health sciences center, 4) integration of the clinical and basic sciences, 5) exposure to experienced and talented scientist educators and mentors, and 6) several added advantages to Fellows, including a local and international externship program.

The goals of this training program are several-fold:

  1. Promote and coordinate interdisciplinary research in the fields of infectious diseases and microbial pathogenesis on the OSU campus.
  2. Develop training opportunities (both bench and classroom) for individuals with an interest in the fields of infectious diseases and microbial pathogenesis.
  3. Discover new diagnostic tools, therapies, and vaccines for infectious diseases, including diseases caused by microbes targeted as agents of bioterrorism.
  4. To make available state of the art laboratory-based training in studies of microbe-host interactions for two pre-doctoral and one post-doctoral trainee while increasing their familiarity with the clinical aspects of infectious diseases.
  5. To optimize interactions among investigators in studies of microbe-host interactions at OSU to create the ideal environment for research and education of trainees.

Current trainees:

Predoctoral trainee, 2017

Ann Gregory, Department of Microbiology Graduate Program, laboratory of Dr. Matt Sullivan.  The Sullivan laboratory uses novel sequencing and experimental approaches to understand the diversity, abundance and functions of bacterial viruses (phages) across ecosystems, and how such knowledge can help develop phage-based applications. Ms. Gregory’s work focuses on exploring the role of viruses in the lung ecosystem, specifically studying their role in lung transplantation success and failure. Lung transplantation success rates significantly lag behind those of other organs. Recent work has revealed the native bacteria and viruses (lung microbiome) may also play a role in transplantation outcomes.  In the lung, the identity of these viruses and whether they are helpful or harmful is unknown. Ms. Gregory's goal is to develop quantitative approaches to better survey the virome in healthy and transplanted lungs over time to better predict lung transplantation outcomes.

Post-doctoral trainee, 2016-2017
Cristina Howard, Department of Microbiology, laboratory of Dr. Matt Sullivan. The Sullivan laboratory uses novel sequencing and experimental approaches to understand the diversity, abundance and functions of bacterial viruses (phages) across ecosystems, and how such knowledge can help develop phage-based applications. Dr. Howard's research in particular focuses on characterizing the mechanisms driving phage-bacterial interactions in nature to advance phage therapy - i.e., use phages and phage cocktails for eradicating bacterial pathogens that cause infectious diseases.  For this she uses, in collaboration with technology experts, a combination of 'omics (e.g. transcriptomics,m proteomics, metabolomics), ribosomal profiling, and single-cell resolution (e.g. phageFISH) approaches.  These approaches provide insight into how phages interact with bacterial pathogens and how bacteria develop resistance against phages, to ultimately develop phage therapy.
 

Former trainees:

Predoctoral trainees
2017, Julia Scordo, Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program (BSGP), laboratory of Dr. Jordi Torrelles
2014-2015 & 2015-2016, Cynthia Canan, Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program (BSGP), laboratory of Dr. Joanne Turner.
2014-2015 & 2015-2016, Andrew Garfoot, Department of Microbiology, laboratory of Dr. Chad Rappleye.

Post-doctoral trainees
2016-2017, Eusondia Arnett, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, laboratory of Dr. Larry Schlesinger.
2015-2016, Joanna Marshall, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, laboratory of Dr. Stephanie Seveau.
2015-2016, Katherine Miller, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, laboratory of Dr. Brian Ahmer.
2014-2015, Sarika Pathak-Sharma, Department of Microbiology, laboratory of Dr. Stephanie Seveau.
2014-2015, Matthew Swearingen, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, laboratory of Dr. Paul Stoodley.

 

Current Training Program Faculty:

Brian Ahmer, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Amal Amer,  Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Michael Bailey, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Lauren Bakaletz, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Prosper Boyaka, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine
Ian Davis, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine
Raj Deora, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Nick Funderburg, Division of Medical Laboratory Science, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences
Steven Goodman, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Ann Griffen, Division of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry
John Gunn, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Mike Ibba, Department of Microbiology, College of Arts & Sciences
Sheryl Justice, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Purnima Kumar, Division of Periodontology, College of Dentistry
Jesse Kwiek, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Eugene Leys, Division of Biosciences, College of Dentistry
Jianrong Li, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine
Shan-Lu Liu, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine
Kevin Mason, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Stefan Niewiesk, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine
Mark Peeples, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Gireesh Rajashekara, Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine
Octavio Ramilo, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Chad Rappleye, Department of Microbiology, College of Arts & Sciences
Yasuko Rikihisa, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine
Natividad Ruiz, Department of Microbiology, College of Arts & Sciences
Linda Saif, Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine
Abhay Satoskar, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine
Stephanie Seveau, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Paul Stoodley, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Matthew Sullivan, Department of Microbiology, College of Arts & Sciences
Christopher Walker, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
Dan Wozniak, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine
Kelly Wrighton, Department of Microbiology, College of Arts & Sciences
Li Wu, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine
Jacob Yount, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, College of Medicine